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Indian Remote Sensing Satellite System



Introduction


The Indian Remote Sensing Satellite System (IRS) is a program of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), which is responsible for the development and operation of India's remote sensing satellite fleet. The IRS program was launched in 1988, and it currently consists of a constellation of more than a dozen satellites that are used for a variety of applications, such as mapping, surveying, and environmental monitoring.


The IRS satellites are equipped with a range of specialized instruments, such as cameras, sensors, and radar, which are used to collect and transmit detailed information about the Earth and its environment. This information is used for a variety of purposes, including mapping and surveying, environmental monitoring, and scientific research.


One of the key goals of the IRS program is to provide high-quality remote sensing data and services to users in India and around the world. To achieve this, the IRS program has developed a number of initiatives and partnerships, such as the National Natural Resources Management System (NNRMS), which provides remote sensing data and services to various government agencies and private users.


Overall, the Indian Remote Sensing Satellite System is an important program that plays a vital role in India's space research and development efforts. It provides valuable information and services to users in India and around the world, and it is an essential part of the country's efforts to understand and protect the Earth and its environment.


IRS Missions


Over the years, the IRS program has launched a number of missions, which are aimed at collecting and transmitting detailed information about the Earth and its environment. Some of the key missions that have been launched by the IRS program include:

  • IRS-1A: Launched in 1988, IRS-1A was the first satellite in the IRS constellation. It was equipped with a range of instruments, including a multispectral camera and a radar imaging sensor, which were used to collect detailed information about the Earth's surface and atmosphere.


  • IRS-1B: Launched in 1991, IRS-1B was the second satellite in the IRS constellation. It was equipped with improved instruments, including a higher-resolution multispectral camera and a new radar imaging sensor.


  • IRS-1C: Launched in 1995, IRS-1C was the third satellite in the IRS constellation. It was equipped with a range of advanced instruments, including a new multispectral camera, a radar imaging sensor, and a high-resolution panchromatic camera.


  • IRS-1D: Launched in 1997, IRS-1D was the fourth satellite in the IRS constellation. It was equipped with a range of advanced instruments, including a new multispectral camera, a radar imaging sensor, and a high-resolution panchromatic camera.


  • IRS-P6 (Resourcesat-2): Launched in 2011, IRS-P6 (also known as Resourcesat-2) was the fifth satellite in the IRS constellation. It was equipped with a range of advanced instruments, including a high-resolution multispectral camera, a radar imaging sensor, and a high-resolution panchromatic camera.


  • IRS-P7 (Cartosat-2A): Launched in 2008, IRS-P7 (also known as Cartosat-2A) was the sixth satellite in the IRS constellation. It was equipped with a high-resolution panchromatic camera, which was used to collect detailed images of the Earth's surface for a variety of applications, including mapping, surveying, and environmental monitoring.


  • IRS-P8 (Resourcesat-2A): Launched in 2016, IRS-P8 (also known as Resourcesat-2A) was the seventh satellite in the IRS constellation. It was equipped with a range of advanced instruments, including a high-resolution multispectral camera, a radar imaging sensor, and a high-resolution panchromatic camera.


  • IRS-P9 (Cartosat-2B): Launched in 2017, IRS-P9 (also known as Cartosat-2B) was the eighth satellite in the

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